Your question: When should I replace my motorcycle tires?

How long do motorcycle tires usually last?

Experts suggest that tires last for around 5 years, after which you must consider replacing them. This is arguably the most valuable motorcycle safety advice; old, worn-out tires significantly affect the performance and traction level of your bike on the road, making it dangerous to ride.

How often should you replace tires on a motorcycle?

Even if your motorcycle tires look good to you after five years from the date they were manufactured, have them inspected each year by a tire professional. Motorcycle tires never last longer than 10 years. If your bike’s tires are older than this, you need to replace them.

Should I replace both motorcycle tires at the same time?

The answer is no, you probably don’t need to replace both tires at once. That’s because the function of one doesn’t affect the function of the other. In fact, according to Side Car, the rear wheel gets worn out about twice as fast as the front wheel due to how the motorcycle works.

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How many miles do Dunlop motorcycle tires last?

Depends on the tire and size, your weight etc. Bonnie used to get 10000-12000 out of a rear Dunlop on her Road King. I run Metzlers or Continentals and get around 5000-6000.

Is 12000 miles alot for a motorcycle?

Generally, high mileage on a motorcycle is anywhere from 20,000 to 50,000 miles. For sport bikes, the high mileage number will be on the low end (usually around 25,000), while cruisers and touring bikes typically become high mileage in the 40,000- to the 50,000-mile range.

Do motorcycle tires go bad with age?

Motorcycle tires wear out from use, but they can also expire from age. … In fact, most tire companies put the “sell by” date somewhere out around five years from the date of manufacture. So unless you don’t expect to wear the tire out within five years from the date that’s stamped on the sidewall, don’t sweat it.

How many miles should a cruiser motorcycle tire last?

When well maintained and used with the recommended tire pressure, many cruiser and touring tires have been known to last well beyond the 10k mile mark, with some touring owners claiming to have gotten over 12k miles out of the rear and even more out of the front tires of modern sport touring rubber like the Michelin …

What is considered high mileage for motorcycle?

20,000-30,000 miles for smaller bikes is the high number while 50,000+ miles is high for larger bikes. However, here are some other tips to keep in mind when trying to get the most out of your pre-owned motorcycle: Driving habits and road conditions can play a huge part in your motorcycle’s lifespan.

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How much does it cost to replace tires on a motorcycle?

Motorcycle tire change costs between $20 and $125 per tire. Bringing in the wheels of your motorcycle (carry-in service) costs between $25 and $50 and bringing in the whole motorcycle (ride-in service) costs between $45 and $80. On average, the cost to change motorcycle tires is $50 per tire.

Which tire wears faster on a motorcycle?

The rear motorcycle tires will usually wear out faster than the front tires. Rear motorcycle tires may wear out two to three times as fast as the front motorcycle tires do.

How long do Harley motorcycle tires last?

So, how long do motorcycle tires last before you need to replace them? With regular motorcycle service, the average front tire on a motorcycle can last for up to 3,700 miles, while the rear tire might last for 1,800 miles.

When should you change your tires?

When Should You Replace Your Vehicle’s Tires? As a general rule, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) recommends that drivers change the tires on their vehicles every six years.

Is it OK to mix tire brands on a motorcycle?

Some people might think this is a sales tactic, but here’s the thing, tires are developed in pairs, not individually. They’re designed to be used from the start, together. … If you mix and match brands, even if the tires are brand new, you still have the same issue.